Article Index
Sony Scion Project: Big Brake Upgrade
Page 2
All Pages
Sony Scion Project: Big Brake Upgrade

Sony Scion Project: Big Brake Upgrade

The Project Scion tC has moved through many stages of development – power, entertainment and style to name just a few. It’s now time to address an area that is truly functional and can make or (literally) break the success of any performance build – braking. We are honored to be the first to install the new TRD big brake kit for the tC, and thanks to the crew at International Automotive and Custom in Woodbridge, Ontario, the install was painless.

The TRD PTR09-21111 kit features a set of monoblock 4-piston calipers, upgraded brake pads, new brake lines, a pair of cross-drilled, vented rotors and mounting hardware. The size of the rotors and caliper pistons has been carefully chosen to maintain proper front/rear braking bias and ABS functionality. This kit is designed to work with with the tC’s OEM 18-inch wheels in addition to the aftermarket variety that are at least 18 inches in size.


Sony Scion Project: Big Brake Upgrade Sony Scion Project: Big Brake Upgrade

Step 1: Remove OEM brakes

As with most OE-developed products, a very detailed 13-page installation manual is included.

• Raise the car on a chassis hoist and remove the wheels and store in a safe place away from the vehicle.

• Disconnect and cap the factory rubber brake line from the hard line.

• Remove the OE brake caliper and hose, bracket and rotor. Discard or sell on eBay.

Sony Scion Project: Big Brake Upgrade Sony Scion Project: Big Brake Upgrade

Step 2: Modify factory dust shield

• Clean the dust shield and mark the areas to be removed with a paint marker as per pages five and six of the instructions.

• Using tin snips (and wearing gloves) cut away the metal. Use an angle grinder to clean up the edge if required.

• Spray or paint the exposed metal edge with Tremclad or a similar product to prevent rust.

Sony Scion Project: Big Brake Upgrade

Step 3: Install the TRD rotor

• Clean the surface of the hub with a wire brush to ensure the rotor will sit flat.

• Clean the shipping anti-rust coating off the front and back of the rotor with brake cleaner.

• Slide the rotor onto the hub and tighten with a single lug-nut by hand to hold it in place.

• Check for proper clearance between the rotor and the dust shield. Trim the dust shield if necessary.

More Articles

Mazda Miata: Respect the Roadster

Since the word “roadster” was first spoken, someone has always taken to calling them “chick cars”. I think those people were missing out on a real driving experience and now more so than ever. Written by Micky Slinger / Photography…
Read More

Quaife Engineering Factory Tour

What Drives You? The Vision Behind Quaife LSDs. Based in the UK, Quaife Engineering Ltd. has been around since the 60s. Even since the early beginnings, they were out on the race tracks proving their products and strengthening the brand.…
Read More

Project R32: Garrett Twin Turbo Upgrade

It’s been a long time in the works but we finally found the time to wrench on Project R32. With a busy travel and track day schedule, there never seemed to be an ideal time to start the surgery on…
Read More

Wheel of Fortune: VIP Modular Signs, Seals, and Delivers

You frequent the stance and fitment forums. Maybe you’re even a regular at the shows and meets. You marvel at the boundaries that have been pushed. Sure, there may be people who just don’t care as much, they don’t care…
Read More

Crouching Stallion, Hidden Monster: JJ Dubec's Ferrari 458

Coming off of his R35 GT-R refresh that features a shiny new wrap and a set of deep-dish Sky Forged S208 wheels, JJ Dubec’s newest endeavor has him going big. Real big! With a strong team of builders, suppliers, and…
Read More