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Sony Scion Project: Big Brake Upgrade
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Sony Scion Project: Big Brake Upgrade

Step 4: Install TRD caliper

• Remove the caliper bridge, brake pads and foam spacer from the caliper.

• Align the mounting holes on the rear of the caliper with the steering knuckle and insert newly provided hardware. Note: the factory hardware is a different

thread pitch and will damage the caliper if you attempt to use it.

• Torque the mounting bolts to 79 lb-ft.

• Reinstall the brake pads and caliper bridge. Do not torque the retention bolt – tighten snugly.Sony Scion Project: Big Brake Upgrade

Sony Scion Project: Big Brake Upgrade

Step 5: Install new TRD braided lines

• Attach the new braided lines to the mounting point on the strut.

• Thread the steel line fitting into the top thread and install into chassis mount with retaining clip.

• Tighten the fitting on the steel line to 132 lb-in using a line wrench.

• Connect the other end of the line to the caliper with the new copper washers. Tighten to 168lb-in.

Sony Scion Project: Big Brake Upgrade

Step 6: Bleed the brakes

• Fill the brake fluid reservoir with brand new high quality brake fluid.

• Attach a length of hose to the bleeder valve on the top of the brake caliper.

• Have a friend push the brake pedal to the floor and hold.

• Open the bleeder valve slightly to let air bubbles escape.

• Pump brake pedal and repeat until no bubbles escape, topping up the reservoir as required.

Sony Scion Project: Big Brake Upgrade

Step 7: Check everything

• Confirm that all mounting hardware is secure and torqued appropriately.

• Confirm the wheel will turn lock-to-lock with no line binding.

• Clean brake calipers and rotors with brake cleaner and clean rag. Remove L and R labels.

• Reinstall cool Five Axis wheels and torque to 75 lb-ft.

Sony Scion Project: Big Brake Upgrade

Step 8: Bed-In the brakes

• In a safe and legal location, bring the vehicle up to 100 km/h and brake firmly down to 10 km/h.

• Repeat this procedure 10 times in quick succession to get heat into the pads and rotors.

• DO NOT STOP THE VEHICLE!

• Drive around to cool the brakes for 10 minutes without stopping.

• Repeat the 10 braking process steps followed by a cooling drive.

• You may repeat this a third time if desired. Failure to bed-in the brakes will result in poor performance and uneven pad deposition onto the rotor which could result in vibration. Don’t worry about the smell during the bed-in process – that’s normal!


 

TRD - www.toyotaracing.com/trd

IAC - www.iactech.com



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